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Good, simple food – enough for everyone – is humanity’s uniting force. It can also be one of our most divisive tools. When it is grown wisely, in harmony with nature, prepared with traditional skills, and valued fairly for all workers involved, it can transform an individual, a family, a city, the world.  When it isn’t, what we resign to call “food” is literally dangerous to our health.

This week, a week of societal unrest and division like few I’ve known, I was magically buoyed by a diverse group of people who usually stand stubbornly on two different sides of the fence: conventional farmers and organic farmers.  They had come together to learn from each other. They had come together to listen. They had come together as friends and neighbors and fellow humans.

This was on Wednesday morning, November 9, at 9am, in tiny Keysville, GA. My eyes were stuff puffy and bloodshot from staying up late and waking up early to witness our national elections. But there they were, ready to go, chipper morning people, every one of them. Organic farmers shared the philosophical joys and the sometimes painful sacrifices they make to grow the way they grow. Conventional farmers shared their economic and practical concerns – real, honest concerns – about transitioning to organic practices.  It was exactly what I needed at that moment in time. Heck, it was exactly what our country needed at that moment in time.

It will surprise no one that this incredible gathering was organized by Sam and Loretta of Adderson’s Fresh Produce.  They have made no bones about the fact that this has been their goal all along, to inspire — one neighbor farmer at a time – to transition to cleaner farming, cooking and eating practices. Because they had laid the groundwork for years in the most respectful and inclusive way possible, they brought to the table earned credibility and trust. This is the stuff of social healing. I wish you all could have been there. I wish the world could have been there.

Thank you Sam and Loretta Adderson. From the bottom of my humbled heart, thank you.

-Kim

 

Upcoming Events

 

OLDWAYS AFRICAN HERITAGE COOKING CLASS SERIES

OLDWAYS AFRICAN HERITAGE COOKING CLASS SERIES

August 17, 2017
5:30 pm - 7:30 pm
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Icebox Urban Farm
1736 Fenwick St
Augusta GA 30904

POLLINATION EDUCATION AT PHINIZY SWAMP

POLLINATION EDUCATION AT PHINIZY SWAMP

August 19, 2017
10:00 am - 12:00 pm
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Phinizy Swamp Nature Park
1858 Lock and Dam Road
Augusta GA 30906

OLDWAYS AFRICAN HERITAGE COOKING CLASS SERIES

OLDWAYS AFRICAN HERITAGE COOKING CLASS SERIES

August 24, 2017
5:30 pm - 7:30 pm
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Icebox Urban Farm
1736 Fenwick St
Augusta GA 30904

GROWLER GARDENING

GROWLER GARDENING

August 25, 2017
5:00 pm - 7:00 pm
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The Clubhou.se
540 Telfair Street
Augusta GA 30901

WORK DAY AT THE MASTERS TABLE SOUP KITCHEN GARDENS

WORK DAY AT THE MASTERS TABLE SOUP KITCHEN GARDENS

August 26, 2017
9:00 am - 12:00 pm
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Masters Table Soup Kitchen
702 Fenwick Street
Augusta GA

 

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Some of the happenings this week…

 

Eggplant with Buttermilk Sauce

I swear I am not an addict, but if I keep going on like this, we will have to rename these posts: “Tara cooks from Ottolenghi.”  Yes, once again I bring you a recipe from Chef Yotam’s book “Plenty,” but in my defense, I made this on Sunday and it really is a revelation in how you can eat eggplant.  I do like eggplant a lot, but other than in baba ganoush, or a salad with lots of other things, I have never really thought about eating it at room temperature…this was obviously an oversight, because WOW; this recipe is so good.  The combo of the roasted eggplant with the tangy-ness of the buttermilk and the tart crispness of the pomegranate is just perfect.  It even gets bonus points for being so freaking easy and double bonus points for being pretty.  I know that the recipe says to use two large, long eggplant, but it does not matter; any globe style eggplant will work.  Also, take note, if you go to the Epicurious link, there is a misprint about the oven temperature (it says 200F, that should be 200C or 400F.)  Go and order some eggplant now, so you can be eating this soon.

Green Gazpacho

This has been a busy summer for me, so once again I am posting early.  We have established in these posts before that 1.) I try to eat as seasonally as possible, 2.) I like cold soups in the summer, and 3.) I am mildly obsessed (maybe not so mildly) with Yotam Ottolenghi, so bearing those things in mind, I present this recipe.  Let me just shout out that this soup is great!!!  Don’t let the fact that it is green and cold scare you, this is a hearty summer dish that is full of flavor and just so good for you.  I made this ahead of time to enjoy for lunch throughout this hot week .  I did not add the ice cubes, because I knew I would not be eating it right away and to me, it only got better as the week progressed.  Just like bone warming hot winter soups, cold summer soups can be comfort food, especially if you like a little spice and add the green chile.

Spaghetti Squash Salad with Tomatoes and Pecorino

I have discussed in these posts before that I am not always a fan of substituting ingredients: i.e. If I am eating pasta bolognese, then I want real pasta, not a vegetable spiralized to look like pasta.  I want to appreciate my veggies for what they have to offer without making them a poor substitute for something I really want (rant over now.)  Spaghetti squash is one of those misunderstood veggies that deserves a place at the table to shine on its own merit.  This is a recipe I am excited to try and I hope you will be too.  The picture is one of the other variations of this recipe, but hey, its tomato season, so why not celebrate those as well.  This combo really screams summer to me and I hope if you have been burying your squash under pasta sauce, you will make this salad and give the squash its place in the sun.

About The Author

Kim Hines

My mom is my inspiration. She taught us girls to feed the soil with every natural resource that came her way. It would be decades before I appreciated her genius. It applies to everything, from food to kids to community. Love you Mama!

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